Knitting@roosterhillfarm.com

or what I do when I am not working or farming …

Rhinebeck Haul

Posted by mobarger on Oct-18-2009

At Rhinebeck this year I had the following goals:
– visit The Fold, Brooks Farm, Briar Rose;
– find cashmere;
– buy buttons;
– find bargains;
– buy Clara’s new book;
– go to a Ravelry meetup.

Let’s see how I did.

First stop was The Fold. This one was so easy to find as their line to pay extended out the door of their building into the streets. This wasn’t going to stop me or Mary! In we went and we both emerged with several skeins. We met Thor in line who gladly wrote up our receipts, and Toni was at the register to ring us up.
STR from The Fold
From left: STR lightweight Rare Gems, STR Mediumweight Rare Gems, STR Mediumweight Crabby McCrabbypants.

Brooks Farm was next over from The Fold so in we went, again nonplussed by the line. Lines were everywhere. There was no avoiding the lines if you really wanted something (unfortunately, artichokes did not make that cut). I love the yarns that Brooks Farm always has, their friendly faces and their Texas accents. And they had sale yarn! When they asked if they could do anything else for me, I wanted to say, “Yes! Take me back to Texas with you!” but I smiled and thanked them instead.
Brook Farm yarns
From left: Ellie (on sale), Ellie (on sale), Duet
BTW, if you know how to discern colors on Brooks Farm labels, please let me know!

I saw many Briar Rose bags wandering around and I wondered how their stock was doing. I had a particular yarn I was looking for! We soon made it over to their booth, admired their sample knits, inquired about the yarn I was looking for, and got No for an answer. They had none in stock anywhere, but maybe soon.

Across the way was Lis and her Heirlooms booth and we visited a while and admired her many woven purses, knit hats, handspun and rugs. We heard someone retell a story of having her handmade hat stolen when she turned her back to try on a matching wrap and hat (I wish I took her picture – her wrap was stunning!). Lis’ friends brought her and her husband a pair of those steaming hot chicken pot pies for lunch. And I bought a pattern of Lis’ for a cable brim hat. I had admired one on our way into the festival. Lis was pleased to hear about that one!

OK so you are probably wondering what yarn I was looking for at Briar Rose? A few weeks ago I saw Anne Hanson’s new pattern for a cowl, “Ivy Vines.” I am not a cowl person but I loved something about this one! And it required cashmere yarn with one of the suggested yarns being made by Briar Rose. In one of the livestock buildings we came across Spring Tide Farm from Maine. The cashmere pelt at the entrance of their booth gave them away. Their selection was sparse and dwindling as we watched. The woman in front of me bought about 8 skeins! The woman behind me picked up the last skein in the color I wanted (a pea soup kind of green). I settled on a golden avocado skein. And soon there were less than 10 skeins left in their display, more people interested in their yarn, and anxious people from Spring Tide Farm. They had no more stock and still a whole other day to sell yarn. Seems like they had a good day.
If the cowl pattern from KnitSpot doesn’t work out for me, they also gave out free patterns with each skein. So I have a backup plan!
Spring Tide Farm Cashmere

There seemed to be a lot of buttons for sale from carved to glass to vintage to clay – you name it. I bought a few. Chatting with another button buyer, we both agreed that you can never have too many buttons. Even if you do not know what you will do with them. I guess they are sort of like yarn in that way.
Buttons!
From left: pin buttons from mystery vendor, nut buttons from same vendor, African-made glass from Melissa Jean, From Handspun by Stefania, glass shawl pin from Moving Mud.

Note to mystery vendor: include your business name on your receipts!

Sankow’s Beaver Brook Farm had cheese and yogurt, thrummed mitten kits, hiking sock kits and $50 sweaters they sell on QVC. I bought a single hank of handspun to make boot socks for Gary.
Brown handspun from Beaver Brook Farm

At Seaport Yarn I found a J-Knits sock yarn in a Rhinebeck colorway. Gorgeous! I also had the pleasure or misfortune to stand behind a complete enabler. First she was holding some other gorgeous sock yarn which turned out to be Punta and irresistible. Then she asked if I had tried square needles yet. I had not, and would you believe there were baskets of them in the checkout line? I bought a set of size 1’s – I was hoping for 2.25 but only found the ones. I know 99.9% of WendyKnits patterns are on this size so they will be put to good and frequent use!
Seaport Yarn
From left: Punta MeriSock, J-Knits “Rhinebeck”

Foxhill Farms 100% Romney
That leaves 100% Romney worsted from FoxHill Farms. I missed seeing the sweet older woman at their booth this year. I have had some great conversations with her. I hope she is ok! This color is Asters. I am not sure what I will do with it, but I love it.They had a wonderful silk-blend yarn this year and I saw people buying some wonderful wonderful colors but by the time I put two and two together, the colors left were just not me.


Crazy Zauerball
Lastly, here is some Crazy Zauerball sock yarn. And no vendor name on the receipt.

I never did find Clara’s book or get it signed. I know she was there though, I’ve seen pictures! And when noon came around for the Ravelry meetup, it seemed a better idea to keep shopping than stopping. So I know I missed meeting lots of people! Other than that, I think I met my goals and then some. I also met up with some great people, for the first time and some for the second and third, and had a great day. And that’s a Rhinebeck wrap! (and you didn’t have to wait in line to get it!)

Rhinebeck 2009

Posted by mobarger on Oct-17-2009

It was in fits and starts and I am sure someone upstairs shifted a number of things to get me there, but by golly, I went to Rhinebeck this year. My first time there was in 2007.
Fall Foliage at the Fairgrounds
The weather was iffy and could have turned nasty, but in the end, it was a great if cool day. The cool temps brought out the handknits! My friend Mary and I had a great time admiring all of them. I wish I took more pictures!


Brooks Farm Here’s a random person at the Brooks Farm booth. Brooks Farm, along with many vendors, increased their booth space this year. But still, the area was so crowded! The lines to pay were usually long in most of the booths we visited. At The Fold, lines went out the door of their building. But Toni was at the register, and she was a joy to meet.


Fiber balls at Weston Hill Farm FLEECE was everywhere – tops, raw, combed – and all so beautiful. Made me wish I was graceful enough to spin, but I have enough of a time getting things knit!


Golding wheel
But really if I had a Golding wheel, maybe I would just make the time. Isn’t this beautiful? I did not look to see if there was a price tag (You know the old adage, “If you have to ask…”).


Lucets
Here is another picture from Golding’s booth, this time lucets. I had never heard of these until this day. They are used to make i-cord. Another vendor sold nothing but lucets, and had an impressive display, but did not allow pictures.


Norm Hall wheel
Here is a spinning wheel made by Norm Hall from Oxford, NY. I had the chance to meet him since he and Mary go way back. He had several examples of wheels of all sizes in his booth. Plus he is a great guy! Again, I did not look at prices 😉


Triangle loom
Here is a triangle loom from a vendor who I can’t remember! This was in the last building we visited, and my eyes were beginning to glass over. A woman winding tops even commented on my expression so I guess I was pretty bad! This was in the 2 story building by the farm museum. Did you notice how empty it was this year? I need to give a shout-out to the owner of Four Directions Weaving who gave me a wonderful demo of an Ashford rigid heddle loom. Now this is a craft that even someone as clumsy as I am can get my hands around.


Felted pillow at Weston Hill Farm
Many, many crafts were on display besides knitting, spinning and weaving items. Crochet was present, rug hooking, needle felting. Look at the is gorgeous pillow from Weston Hill Farm. All of their finished items were sold, but left on display so we could admire them.


Lots of felting
But what really left an impression was the amount of felting going on! From purses to produce, animals to scarves and hats, there is a lot you can do with felting! You can do it, I cannot as proven by past attempts. But look at what some folks can do!


Oassants
Many people were excited to see these ouessant sheep. The farm did not display their name or location but rumor has it that they were from Oregon (thanks Vi!). They were a little skittish so it was hard to take a good pic, but here they are! And soft, so soft.


Rhinebeck animals
Lots of other animals too – many breeds of sheep, alpacas, rabbits. All the llamas we saw were a little grumpy so no pictures of them.


Mary and Lis (Heirlooms)
Here are Mary and Lis in her booth. Lis’ website is here and she spends all year weaving and knitting up items for you to purchase. And people were purchasing, here and everywhere! In fact Mary and I could not believe the amount of finished items available at Rhinebeck and the amount of people buying them. I bought one of Lis’ patterns for a cable brim hat.


Carved pumpkins
So thank you Rhinebeck 2009! We had a great time!
Next up: the Rhinebeck haul.